The Starmer Project by Oliver Eagleton, reviewed by Ashley Chapman

Sir Keir Starmer as the substance, as well as conclusion of this book details, is a dedicated advocate of the UK’s ‘deep state’ – and as such an authoritarian. Therefore, as the book suggests, supremely unfit to be Labour Leader, let alone Prime Minister.

This is someone who listens only to those in uniforn; those with rank. In The Starmer Project: A Journey to the Right published last month by Verso, Sir Keir Starmer comes across as a priggish individual who is brusingly indifferent to justice.

Voting for this politician and former DPP, after reading sixty pages detailing his rise to power by crushing individuals – time and again and with numbing rapacious indifference – in favour of state institutions; one can only surmise, would be tantamount to endorsing a future Big Brother surveillance state with even harsher legal laws imposed to limit political and economic dissent.

Never has the UK been closer to democratic and social political collapse. Brexit offers such a callous operator the legal and sovereign tools to use the state to oppressively manufacture a regime made in his narrow rightwing Labour image.

Following the lazy, corrupt, disjointed premiership of Bojo and co., Sir Keir Starmer will use his knowledge of the judiciary, especially its internal state machine to resolutely further his authoritarian vision.

With hindsight, Corbyn’s biggest mistake was to allow this ambitious establishment facilitator the room to distract with his shadow Brexit brief, and to not see in 2018 that John McDonnell, as Len McCluskey recently said in an interview with Aaron Bastani on Novara Media, and which has been confirmed by Eagleton, was compromised in his conviction that Remainers would split the Labour party. The Labour party conference endorsement of a second referendum, The People’s Voice, on Brexit was a ploy. Remain in Labour was simply an opportunistic divisionary rightwing tactic to regain control of the party – and it worked!

What they and we, especially on the left, should instead have feared is the deep state creation that Sir Keir Starmer represents and what the implications are for the UK should the prevailing historical circumstances allow him to come to power.

Brexit could then unfold into a nightmare of Owellian proportions, and all because Labour party factionalism betrayed its own processes. When Labour said it had turned toxic, following the New Labour years – it was absolutely correct.